Pro-Choice DISTURBED Singer Reacts To BIDEN's Abortion Rights Executive Order

July 9, 2022

DISTURBED's David Draiman has commended U.S. president Joe Biden for signing an executive order Friday (July 8) designed to bolster access to abortion in states that are banning it following the court's ruling two weeks ago to overturn the constitutional right to terminate a pregnancy.

Earlier today (Saturday, July 9),the 49-year-old singer took to his Twitter to share a BBC News article about Biden's executive order and he wrote simply: "Good. #prochoice".

The order attempts to safeguard access to medication abortion and emergency contraception, protect patient privacy, launch public education efforts as well as bolster the security of and the legal options available to those seeking and providing abortion services.

On Friday, Biden blasted the conservative majority on the court for stripping U.S. citizens of fundamental rights he said were protected by the Constitution, such as the right to privacy in health matters like seeking an abortion.

"We cannot allow an out-of-control Supreme Court working in conjunction with extremist elements of the Republican Party to take away freedoms and our personal autonomy," he said from the White House.

On June 24, the U.S. Supreme Court voted to reverse its landmark 1973 Roe v. Wade decision and end 50 years of legal precedent. So far at least eight states, including Texas, Alabama and Missouri, have banned abortion and another dozen are expected to restrict or outlaw access to the procedure over the next two months.

That same day, Draiman decried the Supreme Court's ruling, tweeting: "The government has no business telling anyone what they can and cannot do with their own body. PERIOD.

"This is a travesty.

"#prochoice #freedom".

Draiman's wife Lena Draiman, to whom he has been married since 2011 and with whom he shares an eight-year-old son, apparently agreed with her husband, writing on her Instagram: "This is a sad sad day for women and women's rights. We're taken back to 1972, when government’s control over women's bodies still existed.

"It was only 50 years ago that women gained control over their bodies. And now 50 years later, we lose it again.

"Thank you NYC, CA, HI, and other states that have laws to protect women and their choices.

"I know there will be many 'keyboard warriors' emerging to make their comments. The sheer fact that they feel the need to comment on what someone does with their body or the risk it can put that person, future child and family in, to fuel their own opinion/narrative should open everyone's eyes that it is not genuine concern, it is control. #womensrights #roevswade #injustice #1972"

She added in a separate post: "#womensrights #roevswade We will continue to fight till November. Then we will continue our fight. #thisisnotover".

When the Supreme Court's draft opinion was first published by Politico in early May that showed a majority of the U.S. Supreme Court had voted to overturn Roe v. Wade, Draiman took to his Twitter to write: "The government should not be able to tell anyone what they can and cannot do with their own body. Period. #prochoice #RoeVWade".

The conservative-leaning Supreme Court's ruling came in a case involving Mississippi's request to overturn Roe v. Wade — the court's 1973 decision that legalized abortion in the United States — and uphold a state law that bars the procedure 15 weeks after conception.

Roe v. Wade affirmed the right to receive an abortion under the 14th Amendment, ruling that abortions were constitutionally protected up until about 23 weeks when a fetus can typically live outside the womb.

The Supreme Court's decision overturned what was previously a federal legalization of abortion and has returned the issue to individual states to decide the matter for themselves.

As a result of the Supreme Court's decision, terminating a pregnancy is expected to be banned or significantly curtailed in roughly half of all states in the nation — including nearly every state in the Midwest.

According to Bloomberg, at least 22 U.S. states have laws on the books that will now outlaw abortion in all or most cases, and four others have indicated they will likely move in a similar direction. People living in those places will have to travel an average of 276 miles each way to access the procedure in parts of the country where abortion remains legal, according to Bloomberg News calculations based on data from the Guttmacher Institute, a reproductive health researcher.

According to a CBS News/YouGov poll, a 59% majority of U.S. adults disapprove of the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe vs. Wade, with 41% approving. About half (52%) call the decision a step backward for America, with 31% calling it a step forward and 17% saying it's neither. Among women, two-thirds (67%) disapprove of the ruling, with just 33% approving. A 56% majority of women say that the decision will make the lives of most American women worse.

According to a Forbes, Americans largely oppose harsh abortion laws, with 75% against policies that make it a criminal offense to perform an abortion, 69% opposing policies that ban abortion six to eight weeks into a pregnancy, 80% opposing laws that allow private citizens to sue anyone who aids or abets an abortion and 63% supporting "safe haven laws" in Democratic-led states that would protect people who travel in from other states to get an abortion.

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